Assam

        1. KAZIRANGA  NATIONAL PARK

Kaziranga National Park (pronounced Assamese pronunciation: [kazirawnga Rastriyaw uɪddan]) is a national park in the Golaghatand Nagaon districts of the state of Assam, India. The sanctuary, which hosts two-thirds of the world’s great one-horned rhinoceroses, is a World Heritage Site.[1] According to the census held in March 2018 which was jointly conducted by the Forest Department of the Government of Assam and some recognized wildlife NGOs, the rhino population in Kaziranga National Park is 2,413. It comprises 1,641 adult rhinos (642 male, 793 are females, 206 unsexed); 387 sub-adults (116 males, 149 females, 122 unsexed); and 385 cubs..In 2015, the rhino population stood at 2401.Kaziranga is home to the highest density of tigers among protected areas in the world, and was declared a Tiger Reserve in 2006 (now the highest tiger density is in Orang National Park, Assam) . The park is home to large breeding populations of elephants, wild water buffalo, and swamp deer.Kaziranga is recognized as an Important Bird Area by BirdLife International for conservation of avifaunal species. When compared with other protected areas in India, Kaziranga has achieved notable success in wildlife conservation. Located on the edge of the Eastern Himalaya biodiversity hotspot, the park combines high species diversity and visibility.

 

     2. Kamakhya Temple

The Kamakhya Temple also Kamrup-Kamakhya is a Hindu temple dedicated to the mother Goddess Kamakhya. It is one of the oldest of the 51 Shakti Pithas. Situated on the Nilachal Hill in western part of Guwahati city in Assam, India, it is the main temple in a complex of individual temples dedicated to the ten Mahavidyas: Kali, Tara, Sodashi, Bhuvaneshwari, Bhairavi, Chhinnamasta, Dhumavati, Bagalamukhi, Matangi and Kamalatmika.[5] Among these, Tripurasundari, Matangi and Kamala reside inside the main temple whereas the other seven reside in individual temples. It is an important pilgrimage destination for Hindus and especially for Tantric worshipers. A scholarly study of the Kamakhya Temple was authored by Kali Prasad Goswami, Adari Surendra.

 

              3. Talatal Ghar

The Talatal Ghar  is located in Rangpur, 4 km from present-day Sivasagar, in Upper Assam. Of all Ahom ruins, it is one of the grandest examples of Tai Ahom architecture. The Talatal Ghar is also the largest of all Tai Ahommonuments. Swargadeo Rudra Singha shifted the capital of the Ahom Kingdom from Garhgaon to Rangpur in AD 1702-03. For about a century thereafter, Rangpur remained the capital. It is located in the western part of Sivasagar. The earliest constructions were commissioned by Swargadeo Rudra Singha in AD 1698. Rangpur was the capital of the Ahom Kingdom and served as its military-station.

 

         4.  Guwahati  Planetarium

Guwahati Planetarium is one of its kind centre of astronomical research in Assam and the entire North-Eastern region of India. The Guwahati Planetarium is unrivalled in Assam and rest of northeast India with its distinctive dome and sloping walls that sets it apart in the skyline of the area. The Planetarium uses the Japanese Goto GX instrument. The hardware includes the GX starfield projector, sixty special-effects projectors, and the sky theatre’s sound system. The show software is also supplied by Goto.

Besides daily shows, the Planetarium also regularly organises seminars, workshops and conferences for the astronomy fraternity, and exhibitions, quizzes and outdoor viewing facilities during eclipses for students and the local community.